Roe v. Wade

Romney Data Scientist: Americans View Marriage, Abortion Differently


GinsburgChurchLady.png

United States Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who may or may not have been separated at birth from Dana Carvey’s “Church Lady” character from Saturday Night Live, may have signaled how she’ll decide Hollingsworth v. Perry (covered here by Travis) when she recently characterized the Court’s ruling in Roe v. Wade as somewhat reactionary and hurried.

Americans would be broadly disappointed, argues former Romney 2012 chief data scientist and Target Point Consulting vice president and research director Alex Lundry, if the Court bases its Hollingsworth ruling on Ginsburg’s feelings about the Roe decision. It’s not that Lundry believes the Court shouldn’t be insulated from popular opinion. But when you set aside the substantive and legal differences between the two cases and the policy issues which they embody respectively, Americans fundamentally view gay marriage and abortion in different ways.

He writes in The Daily Caller, looking at opinion polling and demographic data from a number of sources:

A clear majority of the country favors providing same-sex couples with the ability to marry, while opinion on abortion has remained closely divided for almost 40 years. A March poll by ABC News and the Washington Post found that 58% of Americans support gay and lesbian Americans’ legal right to wed — a record high. That majority will likely grow into a broad-based consensus in the not-too-distant future, as polls reveal that more than four out of five voters under 30 support legalizing same-sex marriage.

Will Abortion Go the Way of Slavery?

pro-life

Is abortion in the United States destined to go the way of slavery? A moral evil considered a stain on the conscience of a nation, which future generations of Americans will look back upon with shame and derision in the same way we treat with contempt the thought that anyone could have ever attempted to justify slavery?

While it may seem unfathomable to contemplate, considering how commonplace abortion has become in America since the ruling in Roe v. Wade, it may not be as far-fetched as you might think. Its ubiquitous presence today may be the very catalyst that drives it from our social landscape.

Since the Roe ruling, there have been more than 56 million unborn children aborted in America. Think about that for a moment. In the last four decades, we have killed in the womb enough children to equal the populations of Illinois, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, and Georgia….COMBINED! That is nine times more innocent lives taken than Jews that were killed by Adolf Hitler in Nazi Germany. That is the equivalent of wiping out the entire population of Italy today.

Today we talk of abortion in politically-correct, sanitized terms like “a woman’s right to choose” and “reproductive rights”. It is considered uncouth to discuss in morbid detail the brutal process that the child endures during an abortion before being tossed out as medical waste. To allow ourselves to consider these things would be gruesome indeed, and difficult to reconcile in a nation where we routinely violate private property rights and shut down major construction projects in order to protect the habitat of some snail or lizard.


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