poll

Gallup: Voters trust Romney over Obama on economy

Over the last month or so, President Barack Obama’s campaign has been hammering Mitt Romney over his time at Bain Capital, making charges of outsourcing and carelessly throwing around potential illegal activity. But voters aren’t buying it. In fact, a new Gallup poll shows that voters trust Romney more on the economy than Obama and view his time at Bain Capital as a positive:

Despite concerted Democratic attacks on his business record, Republican challenger Mitt Romney scores a significant advantage over President Obama when it comes to managing the economy, reducing the federal budget deficit and creating jobs, a national USA TODAY/Gallup Poll finds.

By more than 2-1, 63%-29%, those surveyed say Romney’s background in business, including his tenure at the private equity firm Bain Capital, would cause him to make good decisions, not bad ones, in dealing with the nation’s economic problems over the next four years.

Gay Marriage is Racist Since Only White People Support It (Not Really)

-

Usually when something becomes popular because mostly or exclusively white people enjoy it, the collective media/internet outrage machine works overtime to mock, discredit, and destroy that thing. Whether it be pumpkin spice lattes, Wes Anderson, or not vaccinating your children, Stuff White People Like is usually not good for anyone else. But what if only white people like a certain civil right?

A new poll of gay marriage support suggests that might be the case. Last week, YouGov polled nearly 1,000 online respondents and found that 48% of whites support “allowing gays and lesbians to marry legally”, but only 31% who identify as black and 39% as Hispanic do. In fact, they found that a majority of blacks oppose gay marriage.

poll

Welp.

racist

But is it really? And is it even true? (Hint: No, and probably not.) Let’s find out!

The first red flag is the top-line number. This poll finds that only 45% of respondents support same-sex marriage. I say “only” because that’s about 10-15% lower than almost every other poll conducted on the issue in the last few years. If the overall support response is that far off, the demographic breakdowns are probably a bit off too.

Common Core support is crumbling: Opponents still have a long way to go, but they’re shifting the narrative

There is a growing movement inside Congress and states legislatures to fight back against the Common Core State Standards Initiative, and it looks like it’s beginning to bear some fruit. Over at Reason, Robby Soave reports on a new poll showing the tide turning against the the college- and career-ready standards:

The numbers come courtesy of an Education Next poll. In 2013, 65 percent of people supported Common Core. That number fell to a slim 53 percent majority this year—much of that support coming from Democrats, who remained largely unchanged in their overall opinion.

The results for both Republicans and teachers are even more staggering, however. The Republican numbers changed from 57 percent in favor to just 43 percent in favor and the teachers changed from 76 percent in favor to 46 percent.

These results are significant, since they chip away at key assertions made by the backers of Common Core. The backers have often maintained that opposition to Common Core stems from misinformation and that those who understand the new standards best—i.e., teachers—liked them just fine. That is clearly no longer true.

The premise of Common Core is that the same education standards would be applied across the United States. States that participate in Common Core are allowed to develop their math and language arts curricula.

It just keeps getting worse for Democrats: Obamacare disapproval hits an all-time high

The Kaiser Family Foundation released a new poll this morning showing that unfavorable views of Obamacare have jumped to an all-time high since they began tracking opinions of the law in April 2010.

Kaiser’s July tracking poll shows that 53 percent of Americans have an unfavorable opinion of Obamacare, a significant jump from June’s 45 percent. Thirty-seven percent view the law favorably, down from 39 percent last month.

The crosstabs reveal that the unfavorable views of Obamacare increased across party lines, though Democrats and independent-leaning Democrats still remain the law’s biggest supporters. Republicans and independent-leaning Republicans remain the law’s biggest opponents.

Fifty-nine percent of self-identified independents, however, have an unfavorable view of Obamacare, while 31 percent have a favorable view.

Sixty percent want Congress to “work to improve” Obamacare, while 35 want to repeal and replace it. “Even among Republicans and those with an unfavorable view of the law,” Kaiser explains, “about a third would prefer to see the law improved rather than repealed and replaced (32 percent and 36 percent, respectively).”

A very unpopular Harry Reid trails a very popular potential Republican challenger by 10 points

The 2014 mid-term election may not be the only thing worrying Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV). Sure, the Senate is up for grabs and, as it looks right now, Republicans stand a better than even chance of taking back the upper chamber.

But a new poll finds that Reid could be in big trouble if he seeks reelection in 2016. Not only is he very unpopular in his home state, Reid trails Gov. Brian Sandoval (R-NV), who get solid marks from voters, by a 10-point margin:

According to a Harper Polling survey, Reid trails popular GOP Gov. Brian Sandoval, who hasn’t ruled out challenging the incumbent, by 10 points, 53 percent to 43 percent. Veteran Nevada political journalist Jon Ralston first reported the poll’s findings on his website, ralstonreports.com.

Reid’s favorable/unfavorable rating in the poll is significantly underwater (41 percent/55 percent). Sandoval’s rating, on the other hand, is stellar (58/30).

Sandoval is a virtual shoo-in to win reelection this year; he leads little-known Democrat Bob Goodman in the Harper poll, 54 percent to 39 percent.

Obviously, the 2016 election is more than two years away. That’s an eternity in politics, so be very careful in taking away too much from this poll. Yeah, Reid is in trouble, but anything can happen. What’s more, Sandoval is generally viewed as a moderate. He’s done some things in Nevada that haven’t sat well with in-state conservatives.

Today in Liberty: Obamacare disapproval hits an all-time high, Eric Cantor will leave Congress on August 18

“Nobody spends somebody else’s money as carefully as he spends his own. Nobody uses somebody else’s resources as carefully as he uses his own. So if you want efficiency and effectiveness, if you want knowledge to be properly utilized, you have to do it through the means of private property.” — Milton Friedman

— Economy adds 209,000 jobs in July, unemployment rate rises slightly: The economy added 209,000 jobs in July, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and the unemployment rate increased from 6.1 percent to 6.2 percent. Economists had projected 233,000 jobs and that the unemployment rate would hold steady at 6.1 percent. Although the report didn’t meet expectations, this is the sixth consecutive month of 200,000-plus job growth. The labor participation rate — the percentage of Americans working or looking for work — increased marginally from 62.8 percent in June, a 35-year low, to 62.9 percent in July.

— Obamacare disapproval hits an all-time high: The Kaiser Family Foundation has released a new poll finding that unfavorable views of Obamacare have jumped to an all-time high since they began tracking opinions of the law in April 2010. The July tracking poll shows that 53 percent of Americans have an unfavorable opinion of Obamacare, while 37 percent view the law favorably. Sixty percent want Congress to “work to improve” Obamacare, while 35 want to repeal and replace it. The poll also finds that Americans are evenly divided on the Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby decision.

Today in Liberty: House GOP slams Harry Reid’s dictatorial Senate rule, voters remain skeptical of military intervention

“Conservatives who want to seal the border because liberal elites have taken over are directing their wrath at the wrong people. The problem isn’t the immigrants, it’s the elites and their multiculturalist predilections who want to turn America into a loose federation of ethnic groups. Conservatives are right to complain about bilingual education advocacy, anti-American Chicano studies professors, Spanish-language ballots, ethnically gerrymandered voting districts, La Raza’s big government agenda, and so forth. But these problems weren’t created by the women changing the linen at your hotel, or the men building homes in your neighborhood.”Jason Riley

Hey, Republicans, you need to pay attention to this: Millennials really dig candidates with libertarian leanings

I Stand With Rand

Republicans are trying to figure out how to connect with Millennials — young voters between the ages of 18 and 34 — to break the stranglehold that President Barack Obama and Democrats on them. Well, polling data released late last week by Reason-Rupe offers some great insight into the sort of candidate can win this coveted voting block over:

A majority—53 percent—of millennials say they would support a candidate who described him or herself as socially liberal and economically conservative, 16 percent were unsure, and 31 percent would oppose such a candidate.

Interestingly, besides libertarians, liberal millennials are the most supportive of a libertarian-leaning candidate by a margin of 60 to 27 percent. Conservative millennials are most opposed (43% to 48% opposed).

A libertarian-leaning candidate would appeal to both Democratic and Republican voters. For instance, 60 percent of Hillary Clinton voters, 61 percent of Rand Paul voters, 71 percent of Chris Christie voters, and 56 percent of those who approve of President Obama all say they would support a fiscally conservative, socially liberal candidate.
[…]
The fact that a socially liberal, fiscally conservative candidate mainly attracts liberals over conservatives indicates that social issues rather than economics largely drive millennials’ political judgments. It also suggests millennials are more socially liberal than they are economically liberal.

North Carolina voters hate the Obama-backed Internet sales tax, but Kay Hagan supports it anyway

North Carolinians aren’t all that fond of the proposed Marketplace Fairness Act, the Orwellian name given to the Internet sales tax. A recent poll conducted on behalf of the National Taxpayers Union and the R Street Institute found that an overwhelming 70 percent of likely Tar Heel State voters oppose the measure:

The poll, based on a telephone survey of 400 North Carolinians likely to vote in the 2014 general election, showed that 70 percent of respondents oppose the legislation, known as the Marketplace Fairness Act. Opponents say the measure would force online businesses to line the pockets of other states and face scrutiny from out-of-state auditors, while supporters of the bill contend that it levels the playing field between online and brick-and-mortar retailers.

“Across the board, there is surprisingly large opposition to changing the law to impose a sort of Internet sales tax collection burden,” said Andrew Moylan, executive director and senior fellow at the R Street Institute.
[…]
The push against the legislation comes mostly from political conservatives, but Pete Sepp, executive vice president of the National Taxpayers Union, said the poll reveals opposition to the bill from voters of varying political backgrounds and consumer habits.

“Not only those who shop online were concerned about this issue, but those who hardly ever shop online at all,” Sepp said at a Tuesday news conference. “They understand that what this amounts to is a massive expansion of tax enforcement power.”

Today in Liberty: Big decisions expected this week at the Supreme Court, Hillary Clinton is still completely tone deaf

If you have ten thousand regulations, you destroy all respect for the law.” — Winston Churchill

— Big week at the Supreme Court: The nation’s High Court is expected to rule on two cases, as early as this morning. National Labor Relations Board v. Noel Canning deals with the limitations on executive power as it relates to executive appointments. President Obama and his administration insist that the January 2012 appointments to the National Labor Relations Board are valid because the Senate was in recess. That argument, however, is specious, at best. The Senate was in pro forma session — meaning that it had not formally adjourned — when President Obama made the appointments. Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby Stores deals with Obamacare’s contraceptive mandate and the religious freedom of business owners. David Green, the owner and founder of Hobby Lobby, argues that the contraception mandate violates his religious liberty under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993 (RFRA) because it would force his businesses to offer plans that cover the morning after pill, which, he believes, is tantamount to abortion. The question is whether the RFRA, which protects an individual’s right to freely exercise their religion, applies to businesses and corporations because of the objections of the owners. The Supreme Court will issue opinions today, Wednesday, and Thursday.


The views and opinions expressed by individual authors are not necessarily those of other authors, advertisers, developers or editors at United Liberty.