Neil Cavuto

Ron Paul: IRS is coming after Campaign for Liberty

Ron Paul

Campaign for Liberty is doing everything it can to fight back against harassment from the Internal Revenue Service over access its donor list, but former Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) warns that fines the organization faces could be “devastating.”

“Well, they’re after us,” Paul, a three-time presidential candidate, told Neil Cavuto on Wednesday. “They want money from us. They fined us almost $13,000 with daily penalties if we don’t cough it up.”

In an email to supporters on Thursday, Paul, who founded Campaign for Liberty in 2008, explained that the IRS had handed liberty-minded nonprofit with “a hefty fine” and “demanded” that it “turn over sensitive contributor information.”

Paul told Cavuto that the IRS asked for Campaign for Liberty’s donor list two years ago, but that the organization managed to get the tax agency to back off, citing a civil rights-era Supreme Court decision.

“[T]he NAACP fought this way back in 1958 and it was ruled by the Supreme Court [that] you don’t have to turnover names for privacy reasons,” he said. “And they asked us to do that two years ago. We didn’t do it. They accepted our letter, but they’re back at it again.”

Ron Paul Explains Earmarks to Cavuto on Fox

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Dr. Paul explains the truth behind earmarks and the responsibility Congress has to earmark every single dollar.

Tea Party Protesters Talk to Neil Cavuto

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Our very own Jason Pye, along with other Tea Party organizers, speaks to Neil Cavuto about the Tea Party movement.  Citing low numbers, Neil questions whether the Tea Party protests will gain the support needed to have the influence needed, and is reminded that the original Boston Tea Party protesters started with a small minority as well.

Ron Paul Discusses Auto Bailout with Neil Cavuto

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Surprised that Dr. Paul didn’t make it to the recent hearing Congress had with the automaker CEOs, Neil Cavuto questions Congressman Paul about the impending auto industry bailouts.  Dr. Paul’s answer as to why he wasn’t there-

“I know all the answers they’re going to give me, and they’re not going to entertain a serious approach to what they ought to be doing.”

Republicans are right, Obama should be held accountable for his power grabs, but the problem didn’t begin when he took office

Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) indicated this week that he’s preparing a lawsuit against President Barack Obama over his many abuses of executive power, which, he said in a memo to House Republicans, gives the executive branch “king-like authority at the expense of the American people and their elected legislators.”

Republicans, of course, have a legitimate complaint against President Obama, one that brings up very real concerns about separation of powers. This White House has run roughshod over the Constitution by ignoring laws passed by a duly elected Congress or enacting new laws through executive and regulatory fiat. But there’s also a hint of hypocrisy from the GOP.

Fox News host Neil Cavuto brought up the hypocrisy in a contentious interview with Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-MN) on Wednesday afternoon.

“Where was your rage when Democrats were going after President [George W.] Bush on the same use of executive orders?” Cavuto asked. “Because I think you knew then that was a waste of time then, and I think you know in your heart of hearts this is a waste of time now,” telling Bachmann that there are “more important things that you guys have to be addressing than filing lawsuits past each other.”

“Listen, I’m not the one — I’m not the one talking about that,” Bachmann replied. “What I’m saying is that what we have — what’s very important is this, the President trying to establish lawlessness in the United States. That’s a big issue.”

Rand Paul Remains Consistent on Drones Strikes and Immediate Threats

Rand Paul

Last month, Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) made an impressive, 13-hour stand against the Obama Administration’s domestic drones policy. The Department of Justice had made a tepid legal case for drone strikes against American citizens who are merely suspected of being a terrorist. Attorney General Eric Holder later said that a president could conduct drone strikes on American citizens suspected of terrorist activities inside the United States.

Paul objected to the notion.  “I rise today for the principle,” Paul said during the filibuster. “The principle is one that as Americans we have fought long and hard for and to give up on that principle, to give up on the Bill of Rights, to give up on the Fifth Amendment protection that says that no person shall be held without due process, that no person shall be held for a capital offense without being indicted.”

Holder eventually relented his comments, acknowledging that a president doesn’t have the authority to kill an American citizen on American soil, and the coverage of the filibuster boosted Paul’s profile and added to the speculation that he would seek the Republican nomination in 2016. He would go on to win the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) straw poll just days after giving a dynamic speech in which he essentially laid out a platform for the future of the Republican Party.

Sen. Mike Lee on Lawless “Recess Appointments”

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Federal Reserve to monetize more debt

Ben Bernanke

The Federal Reserve announced a third-round of quantitative easing (QE3), during which the central bank will purchase $600 billion bonds in hopes that the debt monetization will stimulate the economy and thus bring down the unemployment rate by one-percentage point.

The move has already been met with derision by GOP vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan (R-WI), who called the Fed’s actions “insidious” during a speech in Florida on Saturday. Before the Federal Reserve announced its decision last week, the Wall Street Journal reported that many economists expressed doubt that another round of quantitative easing would do anything to stimulate the economy. And if they do manage to do anything, it could be as, Neil Cavuto explains, “substituting bubbles”:

The risk with forcibly keeping interest rates low is you create another bubble, which is odd because we’re in the fix we’re in because we burst out of a real bad financial bubble.

My fear is that we’re substituting bubbles.

We’re encouraging the very reckless hedging and leveraging that brought on the last financial meltdown.

I’m not saying that happens again. But you don’t have to be Nostradamus to see where this kind of stuff goes. It’s inflationary, for one thing, and likely prompts a continued run-up in commodity prices that had stalled for a while.

Is Jon Huntsman the new Charlie Crist?

Over at Slate, Dave Weigel offers up an interview by Neil Cavuto from early 2009 with Jon Huntsman, former Governor of Utah, Ambassador to China and likely GOP presidential candidate, where he not only expressed support in the concept of economic; but believed the package being pushed through Congress wasn’t large enough (emphasis Weigel’s):

CAVUTO: Were you against the stimulus, Governor?

HUNSTMAN: Well, if I were in Congress, I probably would not have voted in favor because it didn’t have enough stimulus and probably wasn’t big enough to begin with.

Huntsman has been playing down his support of the stimulus. For example, in a recent interview with George Stephanopoulos, Huntsman said that he wanted more in terms of tax breaks; including a corporate income tax cut. However, Weigel points to a post at Washington Monthly by Steve Benen, who breaks down that claim; posting video of Huntsman in his on words:

Ron Paul sets sights on Federal Reserve

Set to take the helm of an important subcommittee dealing with monetary policy, Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) plans to make life a living hell for Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke:

“I will approach that committee like no one has ever approached it because we’re living in times like no one has ever seen,” Paul said in an interview with NetNet Thursday.

Paul said his first priority will be to open up the books of the Federal Reserve to the American people.

“We need to create transparency there. To see what it is they are buying and lending, and who it is they are dealing with,” Paul said.

Paul mentioned that he hoped to use subcommittee hearings to educate the public about the causes of business cycles—which he believes are mainly attributable to monetary manipulation by central bankers.


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