Mike Lee Ted Cruz

Lindsey Graham is Ignoring the Constitution in Favor of Party Lines

Lindsey Graham

Lindsey Graham has declared war on the Constitution (on the same day Kim Jong Un declared war on his enemies… hmm…). What’s especially funny is that he couldn’t have chosen a less popular time to do so, as the Constitution — courtesy of #StandwithRand — is trending. With overwhelming support for Rand Paul’s filibuster coming from conservatives, libertarians, and even many Democrats; Graham, joined by John McCain, has decided that the possibility of the government killing Americans on American soil without due process is a non-issue.

Graham told POLITICO:

“I do mind our party taking a position completely different than we had with President Bush. I didn’t hear any of these people say anything during the Bush administration. Where were they? I just think it’s politics. I think it’s creating a straw man, creating a situation that doesn’t exist.”

First of all, let’s look at the issue of droning under President Bush. Not once did Senator Paul praise President Bush during his filibuster. Unlike his colleague, Senator Graham, Paul is able to look at an issue based on constitutionality instead of on which political party is at stake. If Senator Graham cared to remember those “good old days”, he might remember the huge anti-war movement that arose during Bush’s War on Terror. Much of that movement was directed at tactics such as waterboarding and use of drones, but the movement was against a Republican president. As a party-line opportunist, I guess it’s not all that surprising that there’s a bit of a memory gap for the senator.

Rand Paul and Ted Cruz to Harry Reid: Stop playing games with the bipartisan Internet Tax Freedom Act

There’s a little bit of good news out of the Senate. Well, at least for now. The upper chamber will move on a short-term extension of the Internet Tax Freedom Act to keep state and local governments from taxing access to the World Wide Web:

Senate Democrats are gearing up to pass a short-term extension of a moratorium on Internet access taxes, according to aides and K Street officials.

The Internet Tax Freedom Act expires on Nov. 1, and Democratic leaders are pushing to extend the moratorium through 2014.

A vote on the short-term extension could come as soon as next week, or when lawmakers return to Capitol Hill after their August break, a Democratic aide said Wednesday.

The bad news, however, is that supporters of the so-called “Marketplace Fairness Act,” the Internet sales tax, are still going to try to attach the measure to the extension of the Internet Tax Freedom Act (ITFA) after the mid-term election. Check out the Orwellian-style doublespeak from this Internet sales tax crony:

Outside supporters of the Marketplace Fairness Act insisted Wednesday that the short-term Internet access measure wasn’t a setback. Lawmakers have little interest in telecom companies potentially noticing rate increases shortly before November’s election.

“No long-term extension of ITFA will occur without MFA because it’s important to keep the Internet tax-free and protect local jobs,” the Marketplace Fairness Coalition said.


The views and opinions expressed by individual authors are not necessarily those of other authors, advertisers, developers or editors at United Liberty.