limited government

Ron Paul on Obama’s Federal Budget

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Dr. Paul, once again, outlines the real culprits of the current economic crisis, and points to the real solutions- less government, lower taxes, decreased spending, the end of devaluing the dollar.

H/T: Matt Chancey

Peter Schiff: Why the Meltdown Should Have Surprised No One

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Naturally a recurrent theme of this lecture was monetary policy, specifically having to do with the dollar’s spiral toward hyper-inflation in the midst of the current economic collapse.  Schiff stressed that sooner than later the rest of the world, more importantly those still buying our debt would wise up to our inability to repay those fiscal obligations.  He told a short story about a wily old man in a certain neighborhood who had hoodwinked the neighborhood kids into vying for the job of painting his fence.  He related the metaphor by surmising, “We’ve got the world painting our fences, as if they don’t have their own fences to paint.”  Essentially, he said the way it is now, we get all the stuff and they only get the jobs.  He then fittingly asked, “What good are jobs without stuff?”  In short, we are barreling straight toward a currency crisis.

Meet the New Boss

In 1971, The Who released Who’s Next featuring one of the greatest songs of all time. It couldn’t be more fitting this week as we usher in our new boss here in the United States thirty-seven years later.

Pete Townshend tells us the story of a rebellious uprising against the ruling class. The opening verse states that there is “fighting in the streets” and that “the men who spurred us on sit in judgment of all wrong.” I can’t help but think of the parallels we have been seeing from the media-tainment industry for months driving home the displeasure that the American people have with the Bush administration and serving as pundits (or should I say puppets) by dishing out the propaganda of who is right and who is wrong.

#IAmUnitedLiberty: Sarah Lee’s passion for the First Amendment and limited government

Note: This is one of a series of profiles of UL contributors and how they became involved in the “liberty movement.” Share your story on Twitter using the hashtag #IAmUnitedLiberty.

How does one become a defender of liberty?

Honestly, I never considered the question before it was posed that UL contributors write a piece on how we found ourselves fighting the good fight for freedom. Thinking about it, I was surprised to discover that (1) I have become something of an activist and, (2) the “how” was a pretty easy question to answer. Because my background is traditional journalism.

After bouncing around for a few years after college working as a counselor at a summer camp for wealthy kids in New Hampshire and odd retail jobs at the mall — trying to get as far away from politics and religion and all the other deep topics that had defined my life growing up in a family where those things mattered and were literally part of dinner table conversation — I finally decided to attempt to make a living at the one thing I knew I was good at without having to try too hard: writing.

John Boehner just doesn’t get it: The difference between the Tea Party and ‘average’ Republicans is enormous

John Boehner

House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) tried to downplay suggestions that there is discontent inside the Republican Party, telling reporters that he doesn’t think there’s much of a difference between the Tea Party and the “average conservative Republican” in Congress:

“I think the tea party has brought great energy to our political process,” he said in response to a question about Tuesday’s primaries, adding that he expects many Republican candidates will continue to adopt the tea party mantle in the future. But he disputed suggestions of a rift between traditional Republicans and upstart tea party-backed candidates.

“There’s not that big a difference between what you call the tea party and your average conservative Republican,” he said. “We’re against Obamacare, we think taxes are too high, we think government is too big. I wouldn’t continue to sing that same song.”

What’s this “we” stuff? This is the same John Boehner who derided and mocked conservative and Tea Party groups that opposed the Republican surrender on the sequester and his leadership team threatened principled conservatives who planned to vote against last year’s budget deal that authorized more deficit spending.

Rand Paul wins 2014 CPAC presidential straw poll, libertarians dominate on issues

For the second year in a row, Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) has won the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) presidential straw poll. The poll also found that libertarians are increasingly growing in influence.

Paul took 31% of the 2,459 votes cast, up from the 25% he earned in the 2013 iteration of the straw poll. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) finished in a distant second place, with 11%. Dr. Ben Carson finished third, taking 9%.

“I am grateful to all the attendees who stood with me. The fight for liberty continues, and we must continue to stand up and say: We’re free and no one, no matter how well-intentioned, will take our freedoms from us. Together we will stand up for the Constitution. Together we will fight for what is right,” said Paul in a statement from RandPAC. “Thank you and onwards to victory.”

CPAC 2014 Presidential Straw Poll

Tony Frabrizio, who announced the results to CPAC attendees, explained that 46% of straw poll voters were between the ages of 18 and 25 and 18% were between 26 and 40.

NC Senate: Mike Lee endorses Greg Brannon in Republican primary

Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT) has endorsed Dr. Greg Brannon in the North Carolina Republican Senate primary and plans to campaign for the conservative candidate in the Tar Heel state later this month.

In a statement released this morning by Brannon’s campaign, Lee called 2014 a “critical year for conservatives,” noting that North Carolina will play an important role in this year’s mid-term election. He stressed the importance of electing candidates that will “work to restor[e] the proper role of government” and “forward positive, specific policy proposals to get America back on track.”

“Greg Brannon is dedicated to enacting a conservative reform agenda in Congress.  He is willing to challenge the status quo and entrenched special interests,” said Lee in the statement. “And he has pledged to work alongside myself, Ted Cruz, Rand Paul, and others in the Senate to change the way Washington works.”

Lee, a Tea Party favorite, has put forward a number of reform proposals in recent months, including pro-family tax reform and policies that would strengthen the middle class as well as create opportunity for the poor.

“Greg Brannon will be a strong voice for the people in the Senate and I am proud to endorse him,” Lee added.

Club for Growth releases 2013 congressional scorecards

Club for Growth

The Club for Growth released its annual congressional scorecards yesterday, offering concerned constituents a snapshot of how their representatives in Washington voted on issues related to limited government and economic growth legislation during the first session of the 113th Congress.

“2013 saw the emergence of several new defenders of economic freedom as well as continued excellence among old allies,” said Club for Growth President Chris Chocola, himself a former member of Congress. “Some members have seen their voting records improve and will be honored this year with recognition of their efforts for the first time.”

“While there are more champions of pro-economic growth policy serving in Congress than at any time before, it’s clear that our fight against the big spenders in both parties has a long way to go,” he added.

Like many organizations, the Club for Growth states positions on legislation or other matters as a way to encourage House and Senate members to encourage them to vote in a manner consistent with limited government, pro-growth views. The votes scored in the 2013 include the efforts to repeal or defund Obamacare, the Ryan-Murray budget deal, the farm bill, and the Full Faith and Credit Act.

The scorecards offer a look at who is living up to the limited government rhetoric on which they run each year as well as those are voting to put more debt on the back of the taxpayer as well as future taxpayers.

Conservatives miss the point on weed and CVS

Yesterday, the drug store chain CVS announced that it would no longer sell tobacco products. The move drew sharp reactions and generated controversy, for and against. President Obama took time away from his busy schedule of campaigning, golfing, and vacationing to praise the decision.

As predictable as the sun rising out of the east every morning, some conservatives took the opportunity to attack President Obama and proceeded to look like fools in the process.

One of the conservatives (the term is used loosely in this case) who chimed in on this pressing controversy was Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL). “Many of the same people applauding #CVS for not selling tobacco are ok with making it easier to buy and smoke pot,” he tweeted, adding the hashtag, “#makesnosense.”

For starters, it appears Rubio is not familiar with the difference between the private sector making a business decision and government policy. CVS can choose whether or not to sell tobacco products. If customers have a problem with this decision they can shop at another retailer.

If someone wants to buy and consume marijuana, however, they may go to prison under current laws. I understand this is a difficult concept for Rubio to grasp, but it is entirely consistent to applaud a private company’s decision to no longer sell tobacco and to oppose throwing people in jail for smoking a joint.

Vince Vaughn explains why he’s a conservative

Vince Vaughn

It’s no secret that Vince Vaughn was an outspoken supporter of Ron Paul’s 2012 presidential campaign. He introduced the Texas Republican at the 2011 Libertarian Political Action Convention (LPAC), noting that Paul’s philosophy is “consistent” and “rooted in the very foundation of America.”

Vaughn — who has starred in a number of films, including Swingers, Jurassic Park: The Lost World, The Wedding Crashers, and Dodgeball — offered a deeper glimpse into his political beliefs last week during a discussion with Adam Carolla.

Recounting a conversation the two previously had about politics, Carolla asked Vaughn if he considers himself to be a conservative.

“I do, yeah. I mean, I’m very supportive of Ron Paul, but I’ve always been, you know, more conservative than not,” Vaughn said, adding that his parents’ hardworking, self-reliant background helped shape his personal political views.

Carolla explained that he, too, identifies as a conservative, though he’s more libertarian on social policy. He asked Vaughn whether he took a similar angle on politics. His answer is more profound than what one would expect from many conservative politicians and talking heads.

“I think that what you come, as you get older, you just get less trust in the government running anything,” Vaughn told Carolla. “And that you start to realize when you really go back and look at the Constitution and the principles of liberty, the real purpose of government is to protect the individual’s right to, sort of, think and pursue what they have interest in.

 


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