income taxes

Majority of Americans Say Federal Taxes Are Just Too High

Americans are scrambling to have their taxes prepared by the end of the day to satisfy Uncle Sam’s thirst for their hard-earned money. Their lack of enthusiasm could have something to do with the fact that over half of the population claims taxes are just too high.

According to Gallup, 42 percent of Americans still say that they are paying enough, or “about right,” while 52 percent say that the taxes they are paying are too high. About two years ago, 46 percent of Americans said taxes were too high, indicating that there has been an increase in the number of people feeling they are simply paying too much.

Gallop found that the view that taxes are fair is more popular among Democrats, whereas Republicans tend to see their tax burden as not fair. According to the latest poll, 54 percent of Americans still regard the income tax as fair. However, this view is becoming less popular over time. According to Gallup, it hasn’t been this low since 2001.

Among Republicans, 57 percent say taxes are too high and 49 percent say what they pay is not fair. Among Democrats, 55 percent say they pay about right, and 69 percent say that what they pay is fair.

Among Independents, the numbers indicate that the difference between those who think their taxes are fair and those who think taxes are not fair is of 7 percent. Slightly more Independents (51%) say the federal income tax they have to pay is fair against 44 percent that say the taxes they pay are not fair.

Tax Bite Leaves Flacco Second Best Paid in NFL

Written by Matt Blumenfeld, State Policy Associate at Americans for Tax Reform. Posted with permission from Americans for Tax Reform.

As reported this week, Super Bowl MVP Joe Flacco and the Baltimore Ravens have agreed to a six-year, $120.6 million contract making the star quarterback the highest-paid player in NFL history, earning an estimated $20.1 million per year. But being the “highest paid player” and earning the most after tax pay are two very different things.

By choosing to remain a Raven, Flacco is now set to pay a combined marginal income tax rate of 51.98 percent. This overwhelming tax rate is composed of the federal, Maryland, and Baltimore County income tax rate, as well as the Medicare tax. And that’s excluding his “jock tax” liability for away games – play the Patriots at Gillette Stadium, pay Massachusetts income tax on earnings for that game - and other taxes levied against him such as Maryland’s property tax.

Given that Flacco is coming off of his best season, the franchise quarterback could have commanded a similar contract from any other team in the league while keeping a greater percentage of his contract. Four of the nine no-income-tax states have professional teams in need of the Super Bowl MVP’s caliber and skill.

State

Team

Federal Income

Tax Burden

State and County

Romney reveals the vapidity of the modern GOP

Sometimes a single statement can say everything.  Often these statements come as off-hand remarks, or in a setting where the speaker does not believe he or she will be recorded.  A recent example from the 2008 campaign was Barack Obama’s infamous “bitter clingers” comment, which is still repeated today by his critics to depict him as elitist and disdainful towards many Americans.  And now the 2012 race has its counterpart.

In comments recorded secretly from a private event, Mitt Romney laid out his assessment of 47% of America, and it’s a doozy:

There are 47 percent of the people who will vote for the president no matter what. All right, there are 47 percent who are with him, who are dependent upon government, who believe that they are victims, who believe the government has a responsibility to care for them, who believe that they are entitled to health care, to food, to housing, to you-name-it. That that’s an entitlement. And the government should give it to them. And they will vote for this president no matter what…These are people who pay no income tax…[M]y job is is not to worry about those people. I’ll never convince them they should take personal responsibility and care for their lives.

Mike Lee on Tax Increases

Mike Lee

Utah Senator Mike Lee has been speaking out against proposed tax increases. He makes some great points in this article on the Daily Caller last week.

Lee points out first that it’s a partisan issue. It seems like everything these days in Washington is strictly partisan. The bickering between parties gets old (especially when both parties are saying the same thing), but I don’t think this is typical Republican finger pointing. Lee is one of a select few senators who isn’t utterly useless; he is the type of senator who would call out his Republican colleagues if this weren’t specifically an issue of Democrats being ridiculous.

Despite his would-be willingness for exposing hypocrisy within his party, Lee does make a few points the Republicans would like you to remember as we head toward November.

For example, the pushing of tax increases to push class warfare, or, in Lee’s words, “dividing Americans by income and pitting them against one another.” Lee even goes as far to say that these calls for higher taxes are out of desperation because “the electorate realizes Democrats are out of ideas.”

He also says that the responsibility for fixing budget woes lies with the Congress, not with the American people, and that the proposed tax increases will stifle job growth. He’s right on all accounts, but this is all buzzword stuff that every Republican  regurgitating through November.

Lee is one of the strongest members of the Senate on fiscal issues, and though he included the big buzzwords, he was exactly right when he said, “The proposal does not solve the problem of out-of-control deficits and debt.”

Debt and deficits. There’s the real problem.

Senate Democrat to IRS commissioner: “No taxes, no bonuses”

Responding to an internal watchdog report finding the IRS gave bonuses to workers who haven’t paid their taxes, Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) fired off a letter to Commissioner John Koskinen demanding that the agency take immediate action to rescind the bonuses.

“I am appalled by the findings outlined in the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration’s recent report that exposes millions of dollars in bonuses and awards paid to Internal Revenue Service employees with conduct issues and federal tax compliance problems,” Manchin wrote to Koskinen. “This is completely unacceptable and must be remedied immediately.”

The TITGA report found that bonuses totaling $2.8 million were IRS employees with disciplinary issues between 2011 and 2012. This includes more than $1 million to workers with outstanding tax issues.

Koskinen was only recently appointed to serve as IRS commissioner. The bonuses came under Douglas Shulman, who served as the agency’s commissioner from March 2008 to November 2012. It was also on Shulman’s watch when the agency targeted conservative groups.

“The faith of the American people in the integrity of their government is corroded every time gross negligence and indecency of this sort comes to light,” said Manchin. “How can we expect the American people—many of whom are struggling to make ends meet—to trust their government when they learn that the very agency charged with collecting their tax dollars is rewarding employees who haven’t paid theirs?”

Massie seeks to eliminate taxation of Social Security benefits

Rep. Thomas Massie (R-KY) has filed legislation that would eliminate the federal income tax on Social Security benefits, which, he argues, would boost retirement incomes for Americans dependent on the program.

“Seniors have already paid tax on their Social Security contributions, so taxing Social Security is double-taxing by the Federal Government,” said Massie in a statement from his office. “Taxing Social Security reduces benefits to seniors.”

“Taxing these benefits is an accounting sleight of hand that redistributes portions of the Social Security trust fund to other areas of government,” he added.

Every American pays a 6.2% tax on all earned wages up to $113,700. When a taxpayer reaches 62 years of age, they can begin to collect benefits from Social Security. Those benefits, however, are treated as income for federal tax purposes if they surpass a certain earnings threshold. Critics, including Massie, note that this double-taxation.

The Senior Citizens Tax Elimination Act, H.R. 3894, would ensure that Social Security benefits are not taxable, nor would seniors have to report that income to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).

“Congressman Massie’s bill blows the whistle on the federal government for double taxing the Social Security benefits of senior citizens,” said Ron DeSantis (R-FL), an original cosponsor to the measure. “Individuals already pay taxes to support Social Security, so there is no reason why these earned benefits should be taxed on the back end.”

Rep. Jim Bridenstine (R-OK) is also an original cosponsor to the measure.

Paul, McConnell introduce Economic Freedom Zones Act in Senate

Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) formally introduced a measure on Wednesday to empower impoverished cities by giving them and their residents a break from the onerous federal tax and regulatory burdens which keep them from prosperity in tough economic times.

The Economic Freedom Zones Act of 2013 would lower personal and corporate income tax rates in cities, counties or zip codes that meets certain criteria, such as those that have either filed for Chapter 9 bankruptcy and an unemployment rate of 1.5 times the national average. The measure would also provide federal regulatory relief, including exemptions from onerous EPA rules that result in the loss of federal highway and transit funds and Davis-Bacon prevailing wage work requirements.

“In order to change our course, we must reverse the trend toward more Big Government by ending the corporate welfare and crony capitalism that limits choice and stifles competition,” said Paul in a statement. “We must encourage policies that will lift up the individual, allow for the creation of new jobs, improve the school system and get these communities back to work.”

“The answer to poverty and unemployment is not another government bailout; it is simply leaving more money in the hands of those who earned it. The Economic Freedom Zones Act of 2013 will do just that,” he added.

CBO study sheds light on income redistribution

Amid falling poll numbers, thanks to the Obamacare meltdown, President Barack Obama has tried to change the narrative with familiar, tired themes of income equality and higher taxes on the wealthy. But a new study from the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), via CNS News, undermines these themes, showing that the 40% of households paid 106.2% of net income taxes in 2010 (emphasis added):

The top 40 percent of households by before-tax income actually paid 106.2 percent of the nation’s net income taxes in 2010, according to a new study by the Congressional Budget Office.

At the same time, households in the bottom 40 percent took in an average of $18,950 in what the CBO called “government transfers” in 2010.

Taxpayers in the top 40 percent of households were able to pay more than 100 percent of net federal income taxes in 2010 because Americans in the bottom 40 percent actually paid negative income taxes, according to the CBO study entitled, “The Distribution of Household Income and Federal Taxes, 2010.
[…]
Although they paid negative federal income taxes on average in 2010, Americans in the bottom 40 percent of households did end up paying some taxes to the federal government that year, according to the CBO.

Number of Americans renouncing citizenship soars, tax laws blamed

passport

There are a number of reasons why an American may renounce their citizenship, but more often than not, United States’ tax laws are to blame. But the number of those renouncing their citizenship, for whatever reason, soared in the second quarter of this year:

While the numbers of those renouncing their U.S. citizenship are small—more than 1,000 people in the second quarter of 2013, out of more than six million Americans estimated to be living abroad—the numbers have climbed this year, according to recently released figures.
[…]
A growing number of wealthy Americans in Asia—and others with green cards—are exploring whether to renounce their U.S. citizenship or give up their green cards to avoid onerous tax obligations.

Some U.S. citizens say they are exasperated by a growing raft of paperwork that forces U.S. citizens living abroad to declare the minutiae of their financial holdings and other assets. That has increased the attraction of becoming a citizen in places such as Hong Kong, where the individual tax rate is capped at 15%.

Kelly Phillips Erb of Forbes notes that the number of citizens renouncing their citizenship in the first quarter of this year, when 679 people opted for friendlier confines, was the longest in 15 years. Of course, that coiencided with a huge tax hike passed in January, with increases on individual income and capital gains taxes included. She also points out that the list in the second quarter came very close to breaking the record set in 1997.

ICYMI: Bill Maher Slams California’s Oppressive Taxation

Bill Maher

You didn’t read the headline wrong. Bill Maher, an entertainer who has staked himself out as a leftist on his HBO talk show, has just about had it with California’s tax burden. During the show on Friday, Rachel Maddow, a MSNBC host, complained that the new House GOP budget is too helpful to “rich people.”

“The Ryan budget is a document that says the big problems in America right now are that rich people do not have enough money, they need relief from confiscatory tax rates,” she said sarcastically. “And poor people have too much access to affordable healthcare, and those things must stop. And if we fix those things, America will be on a better path.”

As Maddow started praising the atrocious House Progressive Caucus’ budget, which was blasted by David Brooks earlier this week, it was noted by former Rep. Tom Davis (R-VA) that the House budget also raises real issue — that Washington has a spending problem.

Maddow continued, explaining that post-9/11 defense spending should be cut. Maher jumped in. “That’s the key!” he said. But he turned the conversation towards taxes, which went against Maddow’s argument.

“You know what? Rich people –- I’m sure you’d agree with this — actually do pay the freight in this country,” he said, pointing to Davis. “I just saw these statistics. I mean, something like 70 percent.”

 
 


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