FBI

Home Brew Server Has Hillary In Hot Water

It is difficult to understate the lasting damage to our republic that would occur if the American people, in a fit of pique, were to elect a dishonest, authoritarian, divisive, immoral, liberal New York Democrat as president. I am, of course, referring to Hillary Clinton (you thought I was talking about the other one, didn’t you?).

Hillary Clinton has long ago proven that she will say and do whatever it takes to acquire, consolidate, and conserve political power into her hands. For example, though she claims to be the champion of women, she has tormented and character assassinated the victims of her serial rapist/abuser husband, Bill, on whose coattails she clung tightly to ensure her own advancement.

For more than a quarter century, Bill and Hillary have proven to be as tough and as slick as Teflon, skating free of the consequences of scandal after scandal, often throwing underlings to the wolves to ensure their own survival. Let’s recap:

Pay-for-play bribes at the Clinton Foundation. Benghazi. Cattle futures pay-outs. The missing Rose Law Firm documents. Whitewater. Stealing furniture from the White House. Filegate. Vince Foster. Selling technology secrets to China in exchange for Democrat donations.

The list is seemingly endless, but as Hillary would say, “What difference, at this point, does it make?!”

Bill Gates Sides with FBI Against Apple and It Is No Surprise

Bill Gates

If anyone was really surprised at the fact that Bill Gates broke ranks with Silicon Valley on the Apple v. FBI issue, they obviously have not been paying attention. As TechCrunch reported, he is blithely claiming that the FBI is just being absolutely truthful, and that there is no way that they have a desire or intention of using whatever mechanism Apple might come up with to fulfill their request ever again.

No, that doesn’t change the fact that Tim Cook was telling the truth about his products. There would be no way to make a backdoor into an iPhone or anything else a “one-time use” fix. Gates knows this, and is lying if he claims otherwise.

Of course, if this had anything to do with Microsoft at all, it’s safe to assume that Gates would be singing a totally different tune. No, it doesn’t matter how much he clarifies his statement on Apple. The bottom line remains the bottom line, and his comments need to be seen as a back-handed attempt to level the playing field when it comes to security in tech.

Anti-Police Rhetoric Leads to Rise In Violent Crime

http://www.lloydmarcus.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Shared-humanity.jpg

 

“For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.” ~ Newton’s Third Law of Motion

 

What is it with cops in South Carolina?

They already have one indicted for the murder of a fleeing suspect, and now we are treated to the sight of a resource officer (school cop) flipping a girl out of her desk and wrestling her to the ground. Granted, there are reports of a separate video from another angle showing that the officer was reacting after the girl hit the officer in the face with her fist (and she’s not a small girl), but this type of video is tailor-made to feed into the anti-cop rhetoric being stoked by the likes of Obama and his race-baiting, anti-cop compatriots.

And it may not be equal, but America is seeing there is certainly an opposite reaction to the demonization of law enforcement by the Obama administration and leaders of the major American cities which have been run by liberal Democrats for decades. And that reaction is a deadly one.

Frequently referred to as the “Ferguson effect” in reference to the riots in Ferguson, Missouri, following the shooting death of a black man, Michael Brown, by a white police officer following a strong-arm robbery, it is the hesitancy of police officers to engage with those possibly engaged in criminal activity, lest they get blame for any resulting violence and face the end of their career, or even prosecution. Police officers are reporting being surrounded by black youths as they get out of their patrol vehicles, recording them even as they taunt them.

Proposed NSA reforms close one loophole while leaving others open

President Barack Obama rolled out a proposal earlier this week that would end the National Security Agency’s controversial bulk phone metadata collection program. The House Intelligence Committee has a proposal of its own purports to achieve the same end.

The proposal pushed by the White House has been received with cautious optimism from civil libertarians, including Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY). They like what they’ve heard, but have explained that the devil is in the details.

Others, like the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), have pointed out that there’s already a proposal in Congress, the USA FREEDOM Act, that would end bulk data collection. Privacy advocates, however, have panned the House Intelligence Committee’s proposal, which is backed by Speaker John Boehner (R-OH).

In Wednesday’s Cato Daily Podcast, Julian Sanchez, a research fellow at the Cato Institute, discussed and dissected both President Obama and the House Intelligence Committee’s proposal, finding them to be welcome news. But he also pointed out that both measures still leave open the possibility of access to Americans’ personal information.

BOOK REVIEW: The United States of Paranoia

 A Conspiracy Theory

Conspiracy theories are only believed by people on the fringe of American politics? Not so says Reason’s Jesse Walker in his latest book: The United States of Paranoia: A Conspiracy Theory. Walker argues quite the opposite in his opening chapter: “The Paranoid Style is American Politics”:

By the time this book is over, I should hope it will be clear that when I say virtually everyone is capable of paranoid thinking, I really do mean virtually everyone, including you, me, and the founding fathers. As the sixties scare about the radical Right demonstrates, it is even possible to be paranoid about paranoids. (p. 24)

For those who are hoping that this is another book in which the author’s goal is to prove or disprove any particular conspiracy theory, Walker makes is clear that this is not what this book is about (for the most part). He also makes a point to acknowledge that some conspiracies have been proven true (ex: Watergate among these, see Chapter 7 for more examples), “At the very moment you are reading this, someone somewhere is probably trying to bribe a politician. The world is filled with plots both petty and grand…” (p.21).  Instead telling the reader what to believe, Walker tells a history about what people have believed on this continent from colonial times to now and how these beliefs have shaped the political debate and very the culture itself.

Rand Paul Issues Second Letter Asking the FBI About its Drone Use

On March 6th, Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) held a 13-hour long filibuster to rally against this administration’s threatening drone policy concerning the targeting of American citizens overseas. He also used the time he had to ask broader questions dealing with the potential targeting of Americans on U.S. soil, which weren’t fully answered.

On June 20th, Sen. Paul requested more answers concerning the current U.S. drone use. Unfortunately, the Senator did not obtain any responses to his first letter, which was directed to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. According to the official release, Sen. Paul questioned the FBI Director Robert Mueller on whether the agency is actively using drones without governance policy, which would be the only way to assure the lawful use of the unmanned devices is authorized.

With the first letter, Sen. Paul asked the FBI for details on the period in which drones have been in use by the agency, and accurate information on whether these devices are armed.

Sen. Paul has now issued a second letter since the FBI failed to provide answers to his questions after Robert Mueller testified before Congress on June 19th claiming that the FBI does operate done aircrafts.

Whistleblower attorney targeted by suspicious burglary

elhombredenegro (CC)

The Dallas law firm of Schulman & Mathias was burgled last week. The unusual circumstances of the case make this more than a simple local police blotter story. Attorneys in this firm represent a Department of State whistleblower, Aurelia Fedensin, involved in a case that details high-level personnel putting undue pressure on investigators, affecting the outcome of cases managed by the department. And the burglary itself involved only computers and file cabinets, in spite of the fact that there were other valuables - including silver  - left untouched. According to attorney Carey Schulman, the burglers cut a hole in a wall of an adjoining vacant office space to gain access, returned to gather more items, and were obviously not concerned about being caught on video in the act. Because of the sensitive nature of the information the attorneys had on the premises, the FBI was called in to investigate.

Those are the facts of the case so far, and because the investigation is ongoing, there is no chance that anyone in the government is going to make any comments on it right now. However, that does not close the door on speculation in the meantime. Given the information that has been released of late by individuals like Edward Snowden, it’s difficult to resist thinking that this highly specific burglary is directly related to the Fedensin case. If that is the case, then the next logical conclusion would be that the government has taken to Watergate-style tactics to deal with its “dirty little secrets.” And that is a very chilling concept to consider.

Google at Your Own Risk - the FBI could be Watching

Google - Robert Scoble (CC)

Riddle me this, riddle me that. Who’s afraid of the big government?

Taking a little literary liberty by twisting the line of the Riddler there, but it does seem fitting at this moment to call that twisted character to mind right now. Only a villain with his particular brand of psychosis should be able to understand the logic of the latest legal debacle facing the internet giant, Google right now.

Anyone that was smart enough to point out that the Patriot Act wasn’t necessarily the smartest move to make in the wake of the 9/11 attacks can gloat a little now. But, that is cold comfort, given the current situation. In a ruling dated May 20, U.S. District Court Judge Susan Illston ordered Google to comply with the FBI’s demands to turn over search data requested in “secret letters.”

It is assumed that the legal wrangling is not over, since Illston put her ruling on hold until the 9th U.S. Circuit of Appeals could decide on the matter. As reported by the Associated Press and Fox News:

Illston’s May 20 order omits any mention of Google or that the proceedings have been closed to the public. But the judge said “the petitioner” was involved in a similar case filed on April 22 in New York federal court.

Public records show that on that same day, the federal government filed a “petition to enforce National Security Letter” against Google after the company declined to cooperate with government demands.

Eric Holder and Operation Gunrunner

Operation Gunrunner, also known as Operation Fast & Furious, has been a bit of an embarrassment to the BATFE to say the least.  The operation, which knowingly permitted illegal straw purchases to go through, knowing that the guns would be send south of the boarder to Mexican drug gangs, hasn’t gone as sunny as planners had hoped.  Now, the spotlight in turning onto Attorney General Eric Holder and his Justice Department.

From a New York Post article on the whole mess:

The ATF’s acting director, Kenneth Melson, has been singing like a canary to congressional investigators as he pushes back against administration pressure for him to resign and take the fall for something that, at the very least, had to include the US Attorney’s Office, the FBI, the Drug Enforcement Administration and possibly the Homeland Security Department.

In a letter to Holder released yesterday, Rep. Daryl Issa and Sen. Chuck Grassley accused the Justice Department of blocking their investigation into the burgeoning scandal (which has resulted in the deaths of at least two American agents and countless Mexican civilians), muzzling the ATF and involving other federal agencies, including the FBI and the DEA, in funding the crackpot scheme.

“The evidence we have gathered raises the disturbing possibility that the Justice Department not only allowed criminals to smuggle weapons, but that taxpayer dollars from other agencies may have financed those engaging in such activities,” they wrote.

Americans must push back against Obama’s unconstitutional domestic spying program

Obama Domestic Spying

The Obama administration is pretty upset by news released by two of the few American corporations that liberals usually adore — Apple and Google. What have these corporations done to incur such wrath? Apple started it with the announcement that its iPhone 6 is being released with an encrypted operating system which will likely take years for government spies to crack, and worse (for government), Apple will not retain their users’ passwords, meaning they can’t divulge user data even if subpoenaed by the federal government. After Apple’s announcement, Google revealed that it will also provide additional protection for users, by setting as the default encryption on its OS to thwart government snooping.

The wailing Cassandras roaming the halls of the CIA and FBI temples are of course prophesying of the apocalyptic destruction that will result from this development, claiming terrorist attacks are more likely now because they will not be able to tap the communications of terrorists plotting to kill us.

And while that may be theoretically true, an argument can be made that it may actually improve their capabilities because now, instead of trying to sift through the phone calls and text messages of 310 million American citizens, they will now be forced to do actual investigative work by focusing their limited resources on only those people that have shown a likelihood of being involved in terrorist activities.


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