David Perdue

This Republican Senate candidate wants to raise your taxes

David Perdue

David Perdue is poised to make the runoff in the Georgia Republican Senate primary, according to recent polls. He’s managed to put his name on the map through his personal largess, dropping nearly $2 million of his own money into his campaign, and quickly become the darling of the state party establishment. He’s saturated the media market, running four television ads to raise his name identification, and, as noted, that strategy has paid off.

But Perdue, the former CEO of Dollar General and Reebok, has come under scrutiny in recent days. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported Perdue, cousin of former Gov. Sonny Perdue (R-GA), has never voted in a general primary in Georgia. Whether Perdue’s camp wants to acknowledge it or not, that’s a red flag, but it’s not the only one that has been raised in the past week.

On Wednesday, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported that Perdue, in an interview with another local paper, floated the idea of “revenue increases” (hint: that’s a code word for tax hikes) to address the United States’ economic woes.

“Is it better to try to get out of the ditch by curbing the growth of spending or increasing revenue?” a Macon Telegraph editorial board member asked Perdue.

“Both,” Perdue replied.

“And that’s a euphemism for some kind of tax increase, of course,” the editorial board member noted.

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“People must fight for something that they want to achieve, not simply reject an evil, however bad it may be.” - Ludwig von Mises

— McConnell wins renomination in Kentucky: Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) took 60.2 percent of the vote over conservative primary challenger Matt Bevin. “The tough race is behind us; it’s time to unite,” McConnell said last night. “To my opponent’s supporters, I hope you will join me in the months ahead and know that your fight is my fight.” Conservative groups that backed Bevin got behind McConnell before he uttered those words. FreedomWorks, for example, sent a statement calling for unity that landed in our inbox at 7:31 pm, not long after the media called the race for McConnell and before he gave his remarks. “Matt Bevin’s principled challenge helped Senator McConnell rediscover his conservative principles come November,” FreedomWorks President Matt Kibbe said. “Competition always breeds stronger candidates, and there is an improved conservative candidate heading into the general election as a result.” Likewise, Erick Erickson, editor of RedState, tweeted this before polls in Kentucky closed.

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