The Problem(s) with Rick Santorum

I’m not a fan of Rick Santorum, and my very direct opposition to the liberal Republican from Pennsylvania (see, there I go again) has brought several of my Christian friends to the surface to ask why I could oppose such a God-fearing, wholesome, family-oriented man like Rick Santorum. After all, isn’t that the exact type of person we need in the White House?

And, yes, the man Rick Santorum wants us to believe he is – that is the type of man we need in the White House. I want a President with a backbone, who knows when to put his foot down and stand strong against an issue, who has the moral character to stand against what is wrong, and who has the courage to stand for smaller government. That man, however, is not Rick Santorum.

Erick Erickson, who I don’t always agree with, but who is certainly right on Santorum, explains in great detail Santorum’s record as a liberal Republican. You can’t look at that record and still make the argument that Santorum is a conservative. It’s impossible.

But beyond his liberal record in Washington is his violent opposition to the concept of freedom. In this interview with Jennifer Rubin, David Boaz (Cato Executive VP) talked about why he opposes Santorum:

…what scares me most about Rick Santorum is not his specific policy mistakes but his fundamental objection to the American idea of freedom. He criticizes the pursuit of happiness! He says, “This is the mantra of the left: I have a right to do what I want to do” and “We have a whole culture that is focused on immediate gratification and the pursuit of happiness…and it is harming America.” And then he says that what the Founders meant by happiness was “to do the morally right thing.” He really doesn’t like the idea of America as a free society, where adults make their own decisions and sometimes make choices that Santorum disapproves.

I could go further into this about how Santorum says the 10th Amendment doesn’t really mean what it says, how he supports the increased involvement of the federal government in the education of our children, about how his understanding of the Constitution is perverted, or how he’s just itching to go to war with Iran; but I think you get the idea. Plus, the real issue worth exploring here is that he can’t win without a brokered convention, and, quite honestly, he can’t win with a brokered convention.

Just recently I saw that Santorum finally admitted what I’ve been saying all along: he can’t win unless there is a brokered GOP convention. What that means is that his efforts to win beauty contests and meaningless primaries are pointless if he doesn’t have 1,144 supporters on the floor of the national convention.

The good news in all of this is that Santorum doesn’t have the organization to get his supporters through the remaining states’ processes to get to the national convention, nor does he have supporters determined enough to support him that they will put forth the effort to get themselves nominated to the convention. That’s the strategy he should have been using all along, like a certain actual conservative in the race.

In short, Santorum can’t and won’t be the 2012 GOP nominee, which is good news, because the quickest way to re-elect Barack Obama would be to nominate Santorum to run against him.

But what about beyond the 2012 election? What about 2016 or 2020? If Romney wins the nomination this year, history shows us that Santorum will start the next GOP presidential primary with an edge over all the other candidates. If you love freedom, that should scare you.

Many friends have asked me if I’ll support the Republican nominee no matter who it is. They ask this, not because they want an honest answer, but because they know I support Ron Paul; and they are looking for an opportunity to make a Paul supporter look like a sore loser. That’s ok; I can’t control the actions of others.

But, no matter their intentions, the truth is that I can not support Rick Santorum for any office. If by some miracle he gets the nomination, he’ll lose to Obama, and Paul supporters will be blamed for four more years of Obama abusing the Constitution. At best, that’s faulty logic; at worst it’s a blatant lie.

With a GOP-controlled House and a likely GOP-controlled Senate, the truth in all of this – and I say this very soberly and with much consideration – is that we’d be better off resisting big government under Obama than we would be applauding big government under Santorum.

Rick Santorum really is that bad, and if you live in a state that has yet to vote in the primary process, supporting Rick Santorum is quite literally the worst thing you could possibly do with your vote.


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