2014 Senate Races and the Term Limits Issue

 

We’re barely through with the 2012 elections, but the 2014 Senate races are heating up quite nicely. This is fun, right? You can see a map here of the 2014 and which way each state leans. I’m keeping a close eye on two of those races specifically: Georgia and South Carolina.

Georgia interests me because it’s my home state but also because it’s the reelection campaign of the man whose liberal idiocy prompted my entrance into political activism. Saxby Chambliss is certain to face a primary opponent, and I’m certain to support that opponent. The only question to be answered is who will decide to run against him. I wrote about this race and Chambliss’ potential opponents recently.

South Carolina also has my eye for two reasons. First, I grew up there, and the vast majority of my family lives there. Second, it’s an opportunity for the state to rid themselves of the biggest imbecile in the Senate. Lindsey Graham is also nearly certain to find a primary opponent, and that opponent is also likely to win my favor (especially if that opponent is Tom Davis).

The problem with these races – and really a lot of the races in the coming Senate election – is that the incumbent has had (at least) six years to build up campaign funds and become part of a system designed to keep him elected. Lindsey Graham has a war chest of over $4 million. That’s enough money to scare off a lot of quality candidates that would give him a run for his job.

What many don’t realize is that senators were never originally intended to be elected by popular vote in the states. That was a change put in place by the Seventeenth Amendment. The original plan was for the House to represent the people and the Senate to represent the interests of the states. As I’ve said before:

The balance between the Houses of Congress (as designed by the founders, without the 17th Amendment) is a masterpiece: in the House, representatives of the people could be thrown out very quickly by an intolerant constituency. In the Senate, senators elected by state legislatures to represent the best interests of the states brought stability to the legislature.

We don’t need term limits. What we need is a repeal of the Seventeenth Amendment.

 
 


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