The Return of SOPA

SOPA

You’d think Congress would learn its lesson. After much of the nation revolted in protest this year, the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) was killed in the House, as was its counterpart (PIPA) in the Senate. Americans don’t want government regulating and policing the Internet. Beyond that, the bill was bad for technology.

SOPA got pulled. We won. We sent a clear message that Congress should keep its grubby paws off the Internet. Victory is sweet!

But now it’s happening again.

Lamar Smith, the stubborn Republican from Texas is pushing his Intellectual Property (IP) legislation back into the forefront, and it seems that his latest effort, the Intellectual Property Attache Act, is on the fast track to be rushed through Congress before the public really understand what’s going on.

TechDirt reported yesterday about how the IP attaches that would be created would be for pushing maximalist policy globally:

Their role is not to support more effective or more reasonable IP policy. It is solely to increase expansion, and basically act as Hollywood’s personal thugs pressuring other countries to do the will of the major studios and labels. The role is literally defined as pushing for “aggressive support for enforcement action” throughout the world.

EFF also reported on the bill, warning of the dangers of placing people in the executive branch whose role is primarily IP enforcement. The bill, says EFF, “is nothing more than the government giving Hollywood traveling foot soldiers.”

From all the reports I’ve been able to find, it seems that this bill has just been leaked and has not yet been formally introduced. We need to get moving very quickly on this. Let your Congressman know right away that you oppose the advancement of government for the sake of Hollywood’s agenda.


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